Dogs snub people who are mean to their owners, study finds

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Dogs do not like people who are mean to their owners, Japanese researchers said Friday, and will refuse food offered by people who have snubbed their master.

Source: Dogs snub people who are mean to their owners, study finds

The findings reveal that canines have the capacity to co-operate socially—a characteristic found in a relatively small number of species, including humans and some other primates.

Researchers led by Kazuo Fujita, a professor of comparative cognition at Kyoto University, tested three groups of 18 dogs using role plays in which their owners needed to open a box.

In all three groups, the owner was accompanied by two people whom the dog did not know.
In the first group, the owner sought assistance from one of the other people, who actively refused to help.
In the second group, the owner asked for, and received, help from one person. In both groups, the third person was neutral and not involved in either helping or refusing to help.
Neither person interacted with the dog’s owner in the control—third—group.

After watching the box-opening scene, the dog was offered food by the two unfamiliar people in the room.
Dogs that saw their owner being rebuffed were far more likely to choose food from the neutral observer, and to ignore the offer from the person who had refused to help, Fujita said.

Dogs whose owners were helped and dogs whose owners did not interact with either person showed no marked preference for accepting snacks from the strangers.

“We discovered for the first time that dogs make social and emotional evaluations of people regardless of their direct interest,” Fujita said.

If the dogs were acting solely out of self-interest, there would be no differences among the groups, and a roughly equal number of animals would have accepted food from each person.

“This ability is one of key factors in building a highly collaborative society, and this study shows that dogs share that ability with humans,” he said.

The trait is present in children from the age of about three, the research papers said.

Interestingly, noted Fujita, not all primates demonstrate this behaviour.

“There is a similar study that showed tufted capuchins (a monkey native to South America) have this ability, but there is no evidence that chimpanzees demonstrate a preference unless there is a direct benefit to them,” he told AFP.
The study will appear in the science journal Animal Behaviour to be published later this month by Elsevier, he said.

Bjorn SolstadDogs snub people who are mean to their owners, study finds
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Bing Gets A New Look

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bing1In order to become faster, simpler, social and more distinguished from the other social media, Bing has used a new look on Thursday the tenth of May.

On Thursday, Bing said it will roll out a new design over the next few weeks that trades in its existing search results page format—a mix of images and various types of text-based results on a one-column page—for a layout in three separate panes featuring traditional text results, results from specific information sources and services, and results related to your social-network friends.

Evolution is especially important if Bing wants to gain market share. The search engine is a very distant second to Google, pulling in 15.3 percent of U.S. search queries in March compared to Google’s 66.4 percent, according to comScore.

Microsoft clearly believes these changes must include increased organization of social content, which has exploded with the popularity of Twitter and Facebook over the past several years. Within Bing’s results, a new “Sidebar” column will organize relevant content from your friends on social sites like Twitter and Facebook. For example, Bing will suggest friends who might be knowledgeable about a specific topic by considering their listed “likes” on Facebook. A feed will also let you see and respond to your friends’ Facebook updates and questions. And users will be able to ask their Facebook friends questions via Bing.

Eman NabihBing Gets A New Look
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Groundbreaking for the Digital Revolution

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digital revolution

Image by Getty Images via @daylife

Internet, Twitter and mostly Facebook were a groundbreaking inventions at the time they were created.

The Egyptian youth used the social medias especially  Facebook in get in contact with each others by creating groups and pages  then they gained hundreds of thousands that started protesting the 25th Jan Revolution, the huge revolution that happened and succeeded in causing the stepping down of  the president in 18 days.

Subsequently, the government blocked Facebook and Twitter and eventually shut down Internet access completely. And with the outside world following the unfolding revolution online, political leaders and others, including Twitter, spoke out against the violence and freedom of expression issues at risk.

The shutting  down of the Internet did n’t stop  the news from flowing. Twitter and Facebook users found ways to work around the blackout. Though, eventually access was completely restored. So, we can consider the Egyptian president stepping down as an amidst groundbreaking digital revolution.

Eman NabihGroundbreaking for the Digital Revolution
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Food and Politics

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The relation between food and politics is a very complex relationship in both directions, each one affects the other.

food and politicsHave you ever thought of how can food or unemployment have psychological effects on people. This can be the major motive that make people get very angry and start revolutions.

As we now see in Egypt, dictatorial regime and the food gathered the educated and less educated people in one revolution. Maybe the people in Tahrir Square have different motives but they all have the same aim, changing the regime. They are all – in spite of their different reasons – looking for a better future and better hopes.

On the other hand  politics now is affecting the food, the revolution that is happening now in Egypt has effects on food, as an example Egyptians  can’t find now enough food, because of curfew the food isn’t transported to the shops.

The New Scientist made this report about the Complexity Theory. It explains a lot of this relation.

The early signs of this are showing. Bread is getting scarce in Egypt’s capital, Cairo. Bakeries are closing for lack of flour and there have been reports that a baker who tried to raise prices was killed. Imported wheat is sitting in ports as cranes and lorries stand idle.
The interlocking dependencies that tie modern economies together spread dislocation further. Even where there is food, Egyptians have little money to buy it, as businesses and banks close, cash machines empty and wages dry up.
Egypt’s uprising was triggered when Tunisia unexpectedly threw off a 30-year dictatorship last month. That uprising was triggered partly by food prices, which hit all-time highs in December.
Since then demonstrators in Algeria, Morocco, Jordan and Yemen have also protested about high food prices. Asian investment bank Nomura recently drew up a list of 25 governments most vulnerable to food shortages – in countries that depend on imports and whose people spend a third or more of their incomes on food – Egypt came sixth. Morocco, Algeria and Lebanon were in the top five; Tunisia came 18th.

Eman NabihFood and Politics
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