Miniaturized Medical Equipment

Truly tiny implants that can test, diagnose, and even alert doctors to problems with their patients will replace costly routine visits. Researchers in the Netherlands say they’ve developed a pill that can be loaded with medicine and programmed to travel to a specific part of the body to unload it. A pen-size device is being developed at the University of Texas that can detect skin cancer without the need for a biopsy.

Nano Memory

Nano Memory 1,000 Times Faster

Nanoscale computer memory retrieves data 1,000 times faster

Memory Storage

Electronic memory designs in the past have largely relied on the formation of transistors. However, research into crossbar switch based electronics have offered an alternative using reconfigurable interconnections between vertical and horizontal wiring arrays to create ultra high density memories. Two leaders in this area are Nantero which has developed a carbon nanotube based crossbar memory called Nano-RAM and Hewlett-Packard which has proposed the use of memristor material as a future replacement of Flash memory.

Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed nanowires capable of storing computer data for 100,000 years and retrieving that data a thousand times faster than existing portable memory devices such as Flash memory and micro-drives, all using less power and space than current memory technologies.

Tests showed extremely low power consumption for data encoding (0.7mW per bit). They also indicated the data writing, erasing and retrieval (50 nanoseconds) to be 1,000 times faster than conventional Flash memory and indicated the device would not lose data even after approximately 100,000 years of use, all with the potential to realize terabit-level nonvolatile memory device density.

Current solid-state technology for products like memory cards, digital cameras and personal data assistants traditionally utilize Flash memory, a non-volatile and durable computer memory that can be erased and reprogrammed electronically. Data on Flash drives provides most battery-powered devices with acceptable levels of durability and moderately fast data access. Yet the technology’s limits are apparent. Digital cameras can’t snap rapid-fire photos because it takes precious seconds to store the last photo to memory. If the memory device is fast, as in DRAM and SRAM used in computers, then it is volatile; if the plug on a desktop computer is pulled, all recent data entry is lost.

Therefore, a universal memory device is desired that can be scalable, fast, durable and nonvolatile, a difficult set of requirements which have now been demonstrated at Penn.

This may not be as impressive as the Optical Memory 50.000 Times Faster, but if this nano-memory gets here before optical memory… I’ll just make due with the nano-memory for a while.

Latest Invention: Technology That Allows Users to See Through Walls and Melt Objects

the University of South Australia in collaboration with Nokia started working on one of their latest inventions that would make it possible for users of cell phones to see through walls.

Their latest invention makes use of augmented reality (AR), being able to overlay graphics on top of real the video. The AR system comes in three types:

X-ray Vision,  Meltvision and Distortvision.

According to Dr Christian Sandor, Director of the Magic Vision Lab at UniSA, users prefer Meltvision over X-ray vision, due to a more appealing look, where structures appear to melt away. As for Distortvision, it changes the mobile video picture so that the objects that cannot be seen “bent” so the person could see them in the image.

It would be interesting to note that the researchers have also been working on an invention that would make it possible for users to see and sense virtual objects. The new technology is called Visuo-Haptic Augmented Reality and it allows an individual to manipulate a 3D object by making use of a head mounted screen and touch-based gadgets.

Dr Christian Sandor explains: “The current method for prototyping involves the development of a 3D design using a computer, which can be viewed on screen or printed out in what is a relatively static presentation.”

For sure so many of you guys would like to see this becomes a reality one day. Tell us what do you think about it. We are really keen to hear from you in that regard.