Enthusiasts hopes to solve space debris problem in 2016

According to a press release, the solution for the space debris issue will be a crowdfunded cubesat Mayak equipped with a special aerobraking system. The rocket Soyuz will take the satellite to the orbit in the second half of 2016.

Space debris is natural (meteoroid) and artificial (man-made) particles orbiting the Earth. Most decommissioned satellites become space junk for years and decades, preventing usage of orbits for commercial and governmental projects. Spacecrafts on low Earth orbit are affected by low-density atmosphere and slowly are running out of altitude.

Typical decay time for a 600 km (373 mi) orbit is years. On-board rocket engines can be used to speed up the process, but it is an unreliable and expensive solution.

Mayak will conduct orbital tests of deployable aerobraking device which will allow to significantly rise spacecraft drag and speed up decay. Aerobraking will allow to lower Mayak’s orbital time from year to just one month.

As the Mayak project is implemented by enthusiasts via crowdfunding, all project data (3D models, drawings, electrical schemes, source code, test programs and test results) will be published for open access.

Mayak has collected approx. $33 000 for testing via two Russian crowdfunding campaigns in 2014 and 2016. Roscosmos has authorized project access to the Soyuz-2 launch vehicle in summer-2016 as a part of the Kanopus-V-IK launch campaign.

The Mayak team started a new campaign on Kickstarter to raise money for manufacturing of a production unit.

Photos and videos are available here.

The scientifically hydropump on discover how it works for your knowledge before you try this device.
 

How to get the best Wi-Fi signal in your house

It’s hard to underestimate how fundamental Wi-Fi is to so many of us these days. Whether we’re watching movies on Netflix, streaming music on Spotify, or downloading every science paper on the web for free, that signal in your home is what keeps us connected to the all-knowing, all-seeing Internet. Yeah, there’s mobile data too, but it can’t compete with home broadband for value when it comes to heavy, ongoing data consumption.

Which is why it’s kind of funny that so many of us take for granted where we place our Wi-Fi router in our homes. After all, you’re paying for that fast data connection to travel a pretty significant distance to your house or apartment, so it’s silly to throw the maximal quality and speed of the signal away because you unwittingly chucked your little digibox in an inopportune location after unboxing it.

It might be common sense to some, but as April Glaser writes at Wired, it’s helpful to think of your Wi-Fi router’s signal strength in terms of its radius of broadcast. That signal extends out in every direction from the router, meaning you should ideally place the device in a central location in your home. Otherwise, if you store it up one end of your pad, you’re really just handing over your quality coverage area to your neighbour, your garden, or the street out front.

Of course, depending on your home and where the phone/data ports in your house are located, that could be easier said than done. The solution then is to consider running some Ethernet cable – which you can buy in some pretty crazy-long lengths – to your router, letting you place it pretty much anywhere in your home you want. (It’s worth noting that connecting your PC or Mac to your router directly via Ethernet will also ensure a faster connection than what Wi-Fi allows.)

As Wired points out, the same principle applies to multiple storeys. If you can place the router as close to the vertical middle of your home, that could improve the signal’s reach overall.

Another thing to bear in mind is walls. Any solid structure can impede Wi-Fi signals, and while the technology can impressively permeate things like walls some of the time, they’ll still have an impact on the signal.

Because of this, place your router in as open a location as possible, away from brick or concrete walls if you can – and similarly avoid the floor, which will block in part any Wi-Fi waves directed downwards.

As we’ve mentioned before, other electronics in your home can interfere with the frequency of your Wi-Fi too, so try to keep your router away from things like TVs, microwaves, cordless phones, and any other kinds of devices that broadcast wireless signals as part of their regular operation.

Don’t forget about your router’s antenna either. Not all router models include an external antenna you can manipulate, but if yours does have one – by all means, manipulate it! Seriously, the angle and direction of your router’s antenna will have an impact on the way it broadcasts radio waves, and it could make a noticeable difference in your home.

Which brings us to our last point. When you’re playing around with Wi-Fi, it’s a good idea to bring a little scientific measurement into the equation. There are plenty of apps and websites that help you measure the download and upload speed of the device you’re currently using, so when you’re trying a new router placement or configuration, take the time to prove to yourself that your new setup is better than your old one – for at least the locations in your house where you’ll most often be needing good data speeds. Good luck!

Here you can get a better Wifi router if you need one.

 

Internet at speeds of 1Gbps by use of LED bulbs

Imagine a technology, which could connect you to the Internet at speeds of 1Gbps, by simply using LED bulbs, free from any waves with potentially harmful effects on the body.

That is precisely what Li-Fi offers. It is a technology in the development phase and is planned to be used first in businesses and then in homes.

Li-Fi, which stands for Light Fidelity, is a wireless communication technology based on the use of the light spectrum.

It sends data by switching the current to LEDs off and on at a very high rate, and is invisible to the human eye.

Safe technology

Li-Fi has many advantages, starting with the absence of radio waves, which could be harmful to health in the long term, and electromagnetic interference.

Also, the Li-Fi spectrum is around 10,000 larger than Wi-Fi’s, making it possible to connect more users together at the same time.

Furthermore, as light cannot pass through walls, there can be no automatic connection from one room to another. But it also means that piracy from outside sources becomes impossible.

In terms of speed, Li-Fi looks highly promising. It could theoretically achieve speeds of 1Gbps, which is faster than the most recent Wi-Fi standard (802.11ac).

Researchers at Oxford University in the UK have achieved speeds of 224Gbps in the lab, which is a record, but it is not likely to become the norm in homes.

In France, several Li-Fi connection experiments are currently underway, mainly in business settings led by specialist companies such as Oledcomm and Lucibel. Velmenni, an Estonian start-up, has already carried out tests in homes.

One of the preconditions for Li-Fi to become commonplace is for the whole environment (companies, public places, housing, etc.) to be equipped with LEDs and for mobile phones to have light sensors compatible with this new technology.

 

Rural water users can finally join the 21st century with a new monitoring device

No more running out of water and definitely no more checking water levels in minus 40 degree weather!  An electronics team in Wainfleet, ON from ParemTech have developed a cloud-based water level monitor, the ptlevel, allowing rural water users with a cistern or well to remotely monitor their water levels.  And more, the device has built in low-level alert features by text and email so you’ll never run dry again.

ptelvel install 300x241What really brings this device to life is it’s high-tech, yet user-friendly, interface and platform.  First of all it is the easiest way around to view your water level.  And second, the technology and programming of the ptlevel displays surrounding water delivery companies.  This enables super easy water ordering and allows water delivery companies the ability to advertise to their local customers.  Another unique feature of this interface that is not available anywhere else is “water level history”.  And more than just past level history, soon it can even predict when you will run out of water!

Installation of the ptlevel can be completed by a certified installer (by a certified ptlevel installer), or can be installed by the purchaser by following simple instructions (drop a line, plug it in, set-up an account!).  The product has only been widely available for 4 weeks but the initial response has been huge.  “We’ve already shipped our first wholesale order more than half-way across the country and we’ve sent out another local wholesale order just today” says Mike VandeBeld, Chief Developer at ParemTech.

ptelvel picture 6 281x500During initial test stages and needs analyses the team found there were many people who had developed their own monitoring systems whether it be a long stick or pole, “eye-balling it”, or even low-technology float switches.  The problem is, there is still no way to be directly alerted when the level is low and there is a risk of running out of water.  With the new ptlevel users can check the level from anywhere, anytime and are alerted to their phone or email; ordering water can even be automatic if they’ve shared their level with their local supplier.

The ptlevel has been long awaited for many rural water users.  ParemTech is also working on a top-secret product right now to be ready for 2016.  The product launch will shape the landscape of the way many country-living residents do life.  The technology is still hush-hush though since they are in the midst of patents and research; you’ll just have to stay tuned to see what they have up their sleeves!

Follow them on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Paremtech or visit their website for more details at www.ptlevel.com!

 

Dogs snub people who are mean to their owners, study finds

Dogs do not like people who are mean to their owners, Japanese researchers said Friday, and will refuse food offered by people who have snubbed their master.

Source: Dogs snub people who are mean to their owners, study finds

The findings reveal that canines have the capacity to co-operate socially—a characteristic found in a relatively small number of species, including humans and some other primates.

Researchers led by Kazuo Fujita, a professor of comparative cognition at Kyoto University, tested three groups of 18 dogs using role plays in which their owners needed to open a box.

In all three groups, the owner was accompanied by two people whom the dog did not know.
In the first group, the owner sought assistance from one of the other people, who actively refused to help.
In the second group, the owner asked for, and received, help from one person. In both groups, the third person was neutral and not involved in either helping or refusing to help.
Neither person interacted with the dog’s owner in the control—third—group.

After watching the box-opening scene, the dog was offered food by the two unfamiliar people in the room.
Dogs that saw their owner being rebuffed were far more likely to choose food from the neutral observer, and to ignore the offer from the person who had refused to help, Fujita said.

Dogs whose owners were helped and dogs whose owners did not interact with either person showed no marked preference for accepting snacks from the strangers.

“We discovered for the first time that dogs make social and emotional evaluations of people regardless of their direct interest,” Fujita said.

If the dogs were acting solely out of self-interest, there would be no differences among the groups, and a roughly equal number of animals would have accepted food from each person.

“This ability is one of key factors in building a highly collaborative society, and this study shows that dogs share that ability with humans,” he said.

The trait is present in children from the age of about three, the research papers said.

Interestingly, noted Fujita, not all primates demonstrate this behaviour.

“There is a similar study that showed tufted capuchins (a monkey native to South America) have this ability, but there is no evidence that chimpanzees demonstrate a preference unless there is a direct benefit to them,” he told AFP.
The study will appear in the science journal Animal Behaviour to be published later this month by Elsevier, he said.

 

A camera has successfully been powered using spare Wi-Fi signals

Researchers in the US have tweaked a regular Wi-Fi router and made it capable of continuously powering a battery-free surveillance camera. Even better, their work didn’t interfere with the router’s data transfer speeds.

The breakthrough could help researchers overcome one of the main challenges when it comes to the development of new technology – including the Internet of Things, which aims to put a chip inside all our household appliances and bring them online: how do we keep everything powered up without lots of cords?

Researchers have long known that the electromagnetic waves broadcast by Wi-Fi routers could be harnessed for energy as well as sending information, but the challenge was finding a way to do this reliably and continuously. A team from the University of Washington in the US has now accomplished this by simply changing the way a router broadcasts. They’re calling their new approach ‘power over Wi-Fi’ or PoWi-Fi.

“The ability to deliver power wirelessly to a wide range of autonomous devices and sensors is hugely significant,” writes MIT’s Technology Review. “PoWi-Fi could be the enabling technology that finally brings the Internet of Things to life.”

In the past, scientists have never been able to harness enough Wi-Fi signals to power anything of much use. But the team’s big break came when they attached a simple antenna to a temperature sensor in order to see how much power they could get from a nearby router.

They found that the resulting voltages produced by the Wi-Fi signals were never high enough to cross the operating threshold of around 300 millivolts. But they often came close.

The problem, they realised, was that Wi-Fi routers don’t continuously blast out electromagnetic waves, they send them out on a single channel in bursts. But by programming a router to broadcast noise across a range of Wi-Fi channels even when it wasn’t transmitting information, they were able to pump out enough signals that their antenna could then use to provide continuous power to electronic devices.

Using their prototype, the team managed to show for the first time that they could not only run battery-free temperature and camera sensors using Wi-Fi signals from a distance of six and five metres respectively, they also proved that they could charge a range of coin-cell batteries at distances of up to nine metres.

They then took their system into six metropolitan homes to show that the set-up worked in real life, and didn’t interfere with data transfer speeds. The results are published over at arXiv.org.

The question that needs to be answered now is how these routers interfere with other signals in the area. “Having a router next door that is blasting out signals on three Wi-Fi channels might not be everybody’s idea of neighbourly behaviour,” writes MIT’s Technology Review. “It is worth pointing out, however, that if this kind of interference turns out to be a problem for current routers, it is one that could be solved in future generations.”

The next step is further testing on these routers under a range of different conditions to make sure they really can help to provide us with regular power for our devices while we browse the Internet. And if that’s the case, then it could seriously change the way we power up our homes. We can’t wait.

Source: A camera has successfully been powered using spare Wi-Fi signals – ScienceAlert

 

Improving the delivery of chemotherapy with graphene

A new study published in IOP Publishing’s journal 2D Materials has proposed using graphene as an alternative coating for catheters to improve the delivery of chemotherapy drugs.

Source: Improving the delivery of chemotherapy with graphene

Our comments

This shows that existing materials is being used in new ways all the time, and that is what true innovation is all about. Finding new uses lot already existing technology is a whole lot easier than coming up with new materials.

Have your say

Use the comment form below to comment on this new use of graphene.

 

20-Year-Old To Launch World’s First Ocean Cleaning System In 2016

An estimated 300 million tons of plastic are produced and thrown away every year. Given that the stuff doesn’t break down easily over time, this is extremely bad news for the environments in which it accumulates.

Source: 20-Year-Old To Launch World’s First Ocean Cleaning System In 2016

Finally there is some movement regarding cleaning up the oceans from all the garbage that is floating around in the water before it lands on our beaches. The garbage mountain in the Pacific Ocean is a major environmental disaster, so this issue has to be taken seriously before it’s to late.

What is your opinion?

Do you think this will work? Use the comment form below to have your say.

 

Fly-catching robot developed by Stanford scientists speeds biomedical research – Deep Stuff

Bio-X scientists have created a robot that expands the scope of biomedical research that can be carried out with a common laboratory organism – fruit flies.

Source: Fly-catching robot developed by Stanford scientists speeds biomedical research – Deep Stuff

The development of new technology keeps going faster, and this is a good example of how robot technology is becoming more and more advanced.

Read the article, and get back here and share your thoughts.

 

Physicists Discover How The Ancient Egyptians Built the Pyramids

Egyptian pyramids are considered the oldest man-made wonder that are still existing on earth, they were built by the Pharaohs of the old and middle families as tombs of the Pharaohs and their entourage, building the pyramids started more than 4600 years ago. There are several types of pyramids a one step pyramids called the Mastaba, several steps pyramids which is called Step Pyramid and the smooth-sided pyramid.

Some people were convinced that the pyramids were built by slaves, others suggested that the pyramids were built by aliens; These are myth that lasted for thousands of years.

The biggest problem that have confused everyone is how did the Egyptians moved the huge rocks – that each weighs more than 2 tons. How did they transfer the rocks from the desert to the area were the pyramids lies and how they were able to get it up.

The secret lies in water as it was noticed in the Ancient Egyptians wall drawings from the tomb of the ancient nomarch that they watered the sand before the sledges run over it but no one knew why, some suggested that it was one of the sacred steps the ancient Egyptians usually did.

Lately Physicists at FOM Foundation and the University of Amsterdam have reached a major discovery that has proved the truth about building the pyramids. The physicists have proved that the Egyptians watered the sand in front of the sledges used to transfer the huge rocks. Adding water to the sand stopped it from piling up in front of the sledges than the dry sand.

Also the water make the sand stick together and easier to be shaped which allowed them to make a ramp for the sledges to run over easily in order they would stack the rocks above the others.

The Physicists did not just give us a theory but they proved it by experiment as they used a small sledge in the laboratory that is analogous to the Egyptian sledges and found out that using the right amount of water the sledge was able to slide on the watered sand as twice easier than the dry sand.

So, it took the scientists more than 4600 years to figure out how the ancient Egyptians built the pyramids and that is a considered a great discovery, of course I can say that the great discovery was made by the Ancient Egyptians when they used the water to build the pyramids, and a great work to build the pyramids.